Last edited by Vokora
Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

11 edition of Cotton and race in the making of America found in the catalog.

Cotton and race in the making of America

Eugene R. Dattel

Cotton and race in the making of America

the human costs of economic power

by Eugene R. Dattel

  • 175 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Ivan R. Dee in Chicago .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slavery -- Economic aspects -- Southern States -- History,
  • Cotton growing -- Economic aspects -- Southern States -- History,
  • Cotton growing -- Social aspects -- Southern States -- History,
  • Plantation life -- Southern States -- History,
  • African Americans -- Southern States -- Social conditions,
  • Slavery -- Political aspects -- United States,
  • United States -- Race relations,
  • United States -- Economic conditions,
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1783-1865,
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1933

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementGene Dattel.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE441 .D237 2009
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23015094M
    ISBN 109781566637473
    LC Control Number2009001342
    OCLC/WorldCa300462565

    Historian Gene Dattel, writing in The New York Times some material from his book Cotton and Race in the Making of America, paints a stark picture of profound change: In , there was virtually Author: Alex Planes. Cotton Mather / ˈ m æ ð ər / FRS (Febru – Febru ) was a New England Puritan minister, prolific author, and left a scientific legacy due to his hybridization experiments and his promotion of inoculation for disease prevention, though he is most frequently remembered today for his involvement in the Salem witch trials. Alma mater: Harvard College.

    This book makes a significant contribution to the global history of cotton and our understandings about the long durée of capitalism. Offering a detailed account, grounded both in well-researched detail and reflective attention to how historical knowledge is produced, Robins has succeeded in producing an important and timely publication.   "Law and Race-Making in Early America" was the eighth lecture of the Diversity and U.S. Legal History Series presented by the Office of the Dean .

      As I write in my book, Empire of Cotton, American slavery (and the cotton it produced) was crucial to the development of global capitalism. Slavery transformed the nation’s politics, too Author: Sven Beckert. Reckoning with Race: America’s Failure. Gene Dattel. Encounter Books, pages. Long before they exploded into violence at Charlottesville, race relations seemed so intractable that Alexis de Tocqueville wrote “the white and black races will [never] be upon an equal footing.” Nearly two centuries later, this seems to be another doleful example of Tocqueville’s prescience.


Share this book
You might also like
A new species of Brachyhyops? (Mammalia, Artiodactyla) from the Oligocene Cypress Hills Formation of Saskatchewan

A new species of Brachyhyops? (Mammalia, Artiodactyla) from the Oligocene Cypress Hills Formation of Saskatchewan

Consciousness and reality

Consciousness and reality

Travel Concessions (Eligibility) Bill[HL].

Travel Concessions (Eligibility) Bill[HL].

Looking into TV

Looking into TV

Dismissal of the naval chief, arms deals expose

Dismissal of the naval chief, arms deals expose

On the lapsed.

On the lapsed.

Man and measure

Man and measure

Historical background of the Brickey-Slinker-Houlette families

Historical background of the Brickey-Slinker-Houlette families

Plan for Marshfield

Plan for Marshfield

bearing of recent advances inpsyvhology on educational problems.

bearing of recent advances inpsyvhology on educational problems.

Marketing management

Marketing management

The portable Arthur Miller

The portable Arthur Miller

Refinements to the Stewart McKinney Act

Refinements to the Stewart McKinney Act

Studies in the flora of Afghanistan.

Studies in the flora of Afghanistan.

ArtBuyer.

ArtBuyer.

Kiss it better

Kiss it better

Cotton and race in the making of America by Eugene R. Dattel Download PDF EPUB FB2

The book captures with great style and intensity the overwhelming influence of cotton and slavery on our economy, finances, social behavior, and political life.

Cotton and slavery prevented the formation of a more perfect union in and as the author concludes America no longer needs cotton, but still bears cotton’s human by:   Cotton and Race in the Making of America book.

Read 7 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Since the earliest days of colonial America /5. Cotton and Race in the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power - Kindle edition by Dattel, Gene. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Cotton and Race in the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power/5(29). Gene Dattel talked about his book [Cotton and Race in the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power] (Ivan R.

Dee, Publisher; Septem ). Gene Dattel, who worked at Morgan. Gene Dattel’s book, Cotton and Race in the Making of America is one of the best books that I have read on the subject of race and the economic impact of cotton. Dattel, a native of the Mississippi Delta, writes compellingly from a personal and intellectual perspective.

The book is an invaluable guide to understanding the American experienceGene Dattel’s book, Cotton and Race in the. Since the earliest days of colonial America, the relationship between cotton and the African-American experience has been central to the history of the republic.

America's most serious social tragedy, slavery and its legacy, spread only where cotton could be grown. Both before and after the Civil War, blacks were assigned to the cotton fields while a pervasive racial animosity and fear of a 5/5(1).

Cotton and slavery prevented the formation of a more perfect union in and as the author concludes America no longer needs cotton, but still bears cotton’s human legacy. Henry Kaufman A very powerful and informative book/4(1).

Cotton and slavery prevented the formation of a more perfect union in and as the author concludes America no longer needs cotton, but still bears cotton’s human legacy. Henry Kaufman A very powerful and informative bookBrand: Dee, Ivan R.

Publisher. Published by (March ) Gene Dattel, Cotton and Race in the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic o: Ivan Dee, xiv + pp. $29 (hardcover), ISBN: Reviewed for by Melinda Miller, Department of Economics, U.S.

Naval Academy. So it's a challenge to be confronted by a new book by Gene Dattel, a former managing director at Salomon Brothers and Morgan Stanley, with the title Cotton and Race in the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power.

It's a sweeping and fact-filled account of the way in which the cotton trade was intertwined with the evil that was. Gene Dattel is the author of Cotton and Race in the Making of America ( avg rating, 47 ratings, 7 reviews, published ), Reckoning with Race ( /5.

Gene Dattel, a cultural and economic historian, grew up in the majority-black cotton country of the Mississippi Delta. He was educated at Yale University and Vanderbilt University Law School. He then embarked on a twenty-year career in global finance as a managing director at Salomon Brothers and Morgan Stanley, spending a majority of his.

America's most serious social tragedy, slavery and its legacy, spread only where cotton couldbe grown. Both before and after the Civil War, blacks were assigned to the cotton fields while a pervasive racial animosity and fear of a black migratory invasion caused white Northerners to contain blacks in the South.

Gene Dattel’s Cotton and Race in the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power (Ivan R. Dee, ) is a book for which I had been looking. While one can find plenty of studies of slavery and the Old South, book-length works focused on cotton’s role, specifically its economic influence, in shaping the antebellum United States are scarce.

Cotton and Race in the Making of America, author Gene Dattel 10/13/11 Slavery, Race and the Origins of American Freedom - Duration:   A two-volume work that spans the country's history, from the arrival of Africans in America in to modern-day race relations, this in-depth study is like an origin story for race, specifically Author: Sadie Trombetta.

Yale, Description, Colloquium, Septem Cotton and Race in the Making of America: Global Economic Power, Human Costs and Current Relevance” The relationship between cotton and the African American experience has been central to the history of the republic.

Cotton was arguably the single most important determinant ofFile Size: KB. His first book The Sun that Never Rose presciently outlined Japan’s long term structural economic problems when conventional wisdom predicted an unassailable economic juggernaut. His most recent book, Cotton and Race in the Making of America () describes the fateful intersection of the power of cotton to the African American experience.

Get this from a library. Cotton and Race in the Making of America: the Human Costs of Economic Power.

[Gene Dattel] -- Since the earliest days of colonial America, the relationship between cotton and the African-American experience has been central to the.

New York, NY: Encounter Books (pub: Septem ) From the author of Cotton and Race in the Making of America, this balanced, original history of sheds new light on racial issues from from nineteenth century cotton fields to present day ghettos.

Reckoning with Race confronts America's most intractable problem—race. The book outlines in a provocative, novel manner American racial issues. Support your team with sports fabrics, blankets & accessories from JOANN!

Shop a variety of cotton, fleece & flannel fabrics from the NCAA, NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, & MLS. The Legends Egyptian Cotton Bath Towels are heavy-weight linens that come in a wide variety of bright colors, ranging from shades of pink and purple to a .Dattel writes: “White America’s answer was simple and resounding: Keep him in the South to cultivate cotton.

Before the introduction of mechanization to the cotton fields in the s, and its full impact in the s, the Great Migration surrounding World War I represented a real threat to the structure of Southern cotton production.